Top Eight Benefits of Barcodes

Barcodes are often overlooked as a method for cutting costs and saving time. A valuable and viable choice for businesses looking to improve efficiency and reduce overhead, barcodes are both cost-effective and reliable.

  1. Barcodes eliminate the possibility of human error. The occurrence of errors for manually entered data is significantly higher than that of barcodes.  A barcode scan is fast and reliable, and takes infinitely less time than entering data by hand.
  2. Using a barcode system reduces employee training time. It takes only minutes to master the hand-held scanner for reading barcodes. Furthermore, employees do not have to gain familiarity with an entire inventory or pricing procedure. This also makes employee training less expensive, since they do not have to be paid for extra training time, and another employee does not have to be compensated for training them.
  3. Barcodes are inexpensive to design and print. Generally they cost mere pennies, regardless of their purpose, or where they will be affixed.  They can be customized economically, in a variety of finishes and materials.
  4. Barcodes are extremely versatile.  They can be used for any kind of necessary data collection.  This could include pricing or inventory information. Additionally, because barcodes can be attached to just about any surface, they can be used to track not only the products themselves, but also outgoing shipments and even equipment.
  5. Inventory control improves.  Because barcodes make it possible to track inventory so precisely, inventory levels can be reduced.  This translates into a lower overheard.  The location of equipment can also be tracked, reducing the time spent searching for it, and the money spent replacing equipment that is presumed lost.
  6. Barcodes provide better data.  Since one barcode can be used for inventory and pricing information, it is possible to quickly obtain data on both. Furthermore, barcodes can be customized to contain other relevant information as needed.  They provide fast, reliable data for a wide variety of applications.
  7. Data obtained through barcodes is available rapidly.  Since the information is scanned directly into the central computer, it is ready almost instantaneously.  This quick turnaround ensures that time will not be wasted on data entry or retrieval.
  8. Barcodes promote better decision making. Because data is obtained rapidly and accurately, it is possible to make more informed decisions.  Better decision making ultimately saves both time and money.

Both inexpensive and user-friendly, barcodes provide an indispensable tool for tracking a variety of data, from pricing to inventory.  The ultimate result of a comprehensive barcoding system is reduction in overhead.

What RED means to you?

February 17, 2011

Is Pink Necessary?

January 24, 2011


Is Pink Necessary?
By ANNIE MURPHY PAUL
Published: January 21, 2011

The “princess phase.” So inevitable is this period in the maturation of girls today that it should qualify as an official developmental stage, worthy of an entry in Leach or Brazelton: first crawling, then walking, then the urgent desire to wear something pink and spark­ly. Whether we smile indulgently or roll our eyes at the drifts of tulle and chiffon that begin accumulating in our daughters’ rooms around age 4, participation in these royal rituals has come to seem necessary, even natural.
Yet the princess phase, at least in its current hyper-feminine and highly commercial form, is anything but natural, or so Peggy Orenstein argues in “Cinderella Ate My Daughter.” As she tells the story, in 2000 a Disney executive named Andy Mooney went to check out a “Disney on Ice” show and found himself “surrounded by little girls in princess costumes. Princess costumes that were — horrors! — homemade. How had such a massive branding opportunity been overlooked? The very next day he called together his team and they began working on what would become known in-house as ‘Princess.’ ” Mooney’s revelation yielded a bonanza for the company. There are now more than 26,000 Disney Princess items on the market; in 2009, Princess products generated sales of $4 billion.

Disney didn’t have the tiara market to itself for long. Orenstein takes us on a tour of the princess industrial complex, its practices as coolly calculating as its products are soft and fluffy. She describes a toy fair, held at the Javits Center in New York, at which the merchandise for girls seems to come in only one color: pink jewelry boxes, pink vanity mirrors, pink telephones, pink hair dryers, pink fur stoles. “Is all this pink really necessary?” Orenstein finally asks a sales rep.

“Only if you want to make money,” he replies.

The toy fair is one of many field trips undertaken by Orenstein in her effort to stem the frothy pink tide of princess products threatening to engulf her young daughter. The author of “Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self Esteem, and the Confidence Gap,” among other books, Orenstein is flummoxed by the intensity of the marketing blitz aimed at girls barely old enough to read the label on their Bonne Bell Lip Smackers. “I had read stacks of books devoted to girls’ adolescence,” she writes, “but where was I to turn to under­stand the new culture of little girls, from toddler to ‘tween,’ to help decipher the potential impact — if any — of the images and ideas they were absorbing about who they should be, what they should buy, what made them girls?”

She turns, like many a journalist before her, to the child pageant circuit, the world of sequined “cupcake dresses” and custom-made “flippers” (dental prosthetics that disguise a gap-toothed smile) that has proved irresistible to reporters since the killing of the 6-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey in 1996. To her credit, Orenstein recognizes this as well-trodden ground. “It would be easy pickin’s for me to attack parents who tart up their daughters in hopes of winning a few hundred bucks and a gilded plastic trophy; who train them to shake their tail feathers on command, to blow kisses at the judges and coyly twirl their index fingers into their dimpled cheeks,” she writes. “But really, what would be the point? That story has been told, to great success and profit.”

Such meta-observations, which appear throughout the book, are part of Orenstein’s method: she argues with herself, questions her own assumptions, ventures an assertion and then has second thoughts — all in full view of the reader. At times, her assiduously cultivated ambivalence seems to paralyze her; she gets stuck between competing concerns, unable to say anything definitive about what she believes. By and large, however, Orenstein’s reflexive self-interrogation is a good match for her material. It allows her to coax fresh insights from the exhaustively analyzed subject of gender and its discontents.

In the case of child beauty pageants, Orenstein offers a shrewd critique of why media exposés of the phenomenon are so perennially popular. They “give viewers license, under the pretext of disapproval, to be titillated by the spectacle, to indulge in guilty-pleasure voyeurism,” she observes. “They also reassure parents of their own comparative superiority by smugly ignoring the harder questions: even if you agree that pageant moms are over the line in their sexualization of little girls — way over the line — where, exactly, is that line, and who draws it and how?” Orenstein allows us to watch her struggle with these questions, and when she arrives at a few answers, they feel well earned.

Orenstein finds one such enlightening explanation in developmental psychology research showing that until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self-­appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

Orenstein is especially sharp-eyed on the subject of what comes after the princess phase, for in the micro-segmented world of marketing to children, there is of course a whole new array of products aimed at girls who begin to tire of their magic wands. These include lines of dolls with names like Moxie Girlz and Bratz: “With their sultry expressions, thickly shadowed eyes and collagen-puffed moues, Bratz were tailor-made for the girl itching to distance herself from all things rose petal pink, Princess-y, or Barbie-ish,” Orenstein notes. “Their hottie-pink ‘passion for fashion’ conveyed ‘attitude’ and ‘sassiness,’ which, anyone will tell you, is little-girl marketing-speak for ‘sexy.’ ”

As Orenstein forges on, braving Toys “R” Us, the American Girl doll store and a Miley Cyrus concert, the reader may occasionally wonder: Is she reading too much into this? After all, it’s just pretend; it’s just play. “To a point I agree,” Orenstein half-concedes, equivocal as ever. “Just because little girls wear the tulle does not mean they’ve drunk the Kool-Aid. Plenty of them shoot baskets in ball gowns or cast themselves as the powerful evil stepsister bossing around the sniveling Cinderella.” By this point the reader knows what’s coming. “Yet even if girls stray from the prescribed script, doesn’t it exert its influence? Don’t our possessions reflect who we are; shape, even define, our experience?”

The author’s process of restless self-examination continues, all the way to the book’s open-ended conclusion. Orenstein has done parents the great favor of having this important debate with herself on paper and in public; she has fashioned an argument with its seams showing and its pockets turned inside out, and this makes her book far more interesting, and more useful. Because the thing about a phase is: kids grow out of it. (The marketers are counting on that.) But parents’ internal deliberations about what’s best for their children are here to stay.

Annie Murphy Paul is the author of “Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/books/review/Paul-t.html?src=me&ref=general

Thinking BIG

December 2, 2010

“As long as your going to be thinking anyway, think big.” — Donald Trump, Entrepreneur and Author

“You have to think big to be big.” — Claude M. Bristol, Journalist and Self Help Author

“Life is to short to be little.” — David. J. Schwartz, Ph.D., Author and Self Help Guru

“Big thinking precedes great achievement.” — Wilferd Peterson, Author and Columnist

“You have to think big to be big.” — Claude M. Bristol, Author and Journalist

“Believe Big. The size of your success is determined by the size of your belief. Think little goals and expect little achievements.” — David J Schwartz, Author and Motivational Guru

“The winners in life think constantly in terms of I can, I will, and I am. Losers, on the other hand, concentrate their waking thoughts on what they should have or would have done, or what they can’t do.” — Denis Waitley, Author, Psychologist and Motivational Speaker

“By asking the question How can I afford it? your brain is put to work.” — Robert Kiyosaki, Entrepreneur and Author

“Most people think small because most people are afraid of success, afraid of making decisions, afraid of winning. And that gives people like me a great advantage.” — Donald Trump, Entrepreneur, Businessman and Author

“Everyone has to learn to think differently, bigger, to open to possibilities.” — Oprah Winfrey, T.V. Host

“Use the big thinker’s vocabulary. Use big, bright, cheerful words. Use words that promise victory, hope, happiness, pleasure, avoid words that create unpleasant images of failure, defeat, grief.” — David. J. Schwartz, Ph.D., Author and Self Help Guru

“Look for the good in every person and every situation. You’ll almost always find it.” — Brian Tracy, Author and Motivational Speaker

“Think little goals and expect little achievements. Think big goals and win big success.” — David. J. Schwartz, Ph.D., Author and Self Help Guru

“Great men are little men expanded; great lives are ordinary lives intensified.” — Wilferd A. Peterson, American Author and Columnist

“I dare you to think bigger, to act bigger, and to be bigger. I dare you to think creatively. I dare you to lead and inspire others. I dare you to build character. I dare you to share. And I promise you a richer and more exciting life if you do!” — William Danforth, Author of I Dare You

If you like these thinking big quotes you may want to check out our article on The Magic of Thinking Big

“It’s better to wear out than rust out.” — David J Schwartz, Author and Motivational Guru

“Failure defeats losers, failure inspires winners.” — Robert Kiyosaki, Entrepreneur and Author

“You are today where your thoughts have brought you; you will be tomorrow where your thoughts take you.” — James Allen, Self Help Author

“Big thinkers see themselves as members of a team effort, as winning or losing with the team, not by themselves.” — David J Schwartz, Author and Motivational Guru

“Every adversity, every failure, every heartache carries with it the seed of an equal or greater benefit.” — Napoleon Hill, Personal Success Author

“It’s kind of fun to do the impossible.” — Walt Disney, Entrepreneur and Dreamer

“We’re going where no one has gone before.” — Richard Branson, Entrepreneur and Businessman

“You are never too old to set another goal or to dream a new dream.” — Les Brown, Author and Motivational Speaker

“Learn to think like a winner. Think positive and visualize your strengths.” — Vic Braden, Champion Tennis Player, Instructor and Author

“Believe Big. The size of your success is determined by the size of your belief. Think little goals and expect little achievements. Think big goals and win big success. Remember this, too! Big ideas and big plans are often easier; certainly no more difficult — than small ideas and small plans.” — David. J. Schwartz, Ph.D., Author and Self Help Guru

“I have learned to use the word impossible with the greatest caution.” — Wernher von Braun, Engineer and Developer of Rocket Technology

“All successful people men and women are big dreamers. They imagine what their future could be, ideal in every respect, and then they work every day toward their distant vision, that goal or purpose.” — Brian Tracy, Author and Motivational Speaker

“Whatever the mind of man can conceive and believe, it can achieve.” — Napoleon Hill, Personal Success Author

“Small thoughts fear the future. Big thoughts are the future.” –Michael Port, Author and Entrepreneur

“Every great achievement is the victory of a flaming heart.” — Ralph Waldo Emerson, Author, Poet and Philosopher

Hand Shake

October 15, 2010

Hand Shake

http://bits.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/10/07/microsoft-and-adobe-chiefs-meet-to-discuss-partnerships/
October 7, 2010, 2:57 pm
What Did Microsoft and Adobe Chiefs Talk About?
By NICK BILTON

Steven A. Ballmer, Microsoft’s chief executive, recently showed up with a small entourage of deputies at Adobe’s offices to hold a secret meeting with Adobe’s chief executive, Shantanu Narayen.

The meeting, which lasted more than an hour, covered a number of topics, but one of the main thrusts of the discussion was Apple and its control of the mobile phone market and how the two companies could team up in the battle against Apple. A possible acquisition of Adobe by Microsoft were among the options.

The New York Times learned about the meetings through employees and consultants to the companies who were involved in the discussions that took place or familiar with their organization, all of whom asked not to be identified because they were not authorized to speak publicly by Microsoft or Adobe. Those involved in the meeting, from its logistical set up to the discussion that took place, were instructed to stay quiet about the two companies holding council.

In the past, Adobe and Microsoft have been rivals with competing software and the companies became really combative in 2007 when Microsoft began promoting Silverlight, its software plug-in for the Web that directly competes with Adobe Flash.

Holly Campbell, senior director of Adobe’s corporate communications, did not deny the meeting took place when asked via e-mail. “Adobe and Microsoft share millions of customers around the world and the C.E.O.’s of the two companies do meet from time to time,” she said. “However, we do not publicly comment on the timing or topics of their private meetings.”

Microsoft said it did not “comment on rumors/speculation.”

One person familiar with the discussion said the two companies had talked about the blockade that Apple’s chief executive, Steven P. Jobs, had placed on Adobe’s Flash software for its hand-held devices and whether a partnership by Adobe and Microsoft could fend off Apple, which continues to grow at juggernaut speeds.

Another person with knowledge of the talks explained that Microsoft had courted Adobe several years ago. But the deal never moved past informal talks as Microsoft feared that the Justice Department would most likely block the acquisition on antitrust grounds.

This person noted that at the time, Microsoft was the dominant force in technology and Google and Apple were not the giants they are today.

Randal C. Picker, a professor of law of the University of Chicago, said in a telephone interview that the technology landscape was drastically different now and that an acquisition or partnership of this nature would likely not be halted.

“There’s not a question that the atmospherics of Microsoft are much more different that they were a decade ago,” he said. “I think you could imagine Microsoft being a more aggressive purchaser in a world where they are no longer an 800-pound gorilla.”

Professor Picker said the Justice Department and the Federal Trade Commission were focused on other large technology companies and consumer-related issues.