BOXES

December 5, 2011

http://www.flickspire.com/m/SimpleTruths/LifeIsLikeCoffee?id=%25%25UNIQUE_ID%25%25&cm_mmc=CheetahMail-_-FR-_-10.28.11-_COFFEEmovie&utm_source=CheetahMail&utm_campaign=COFFEEmovie

October 2011 Gatherings by Camelia

October 2011 Gatherings by Camelia
“Came” means Business Networking (referral business/business gathering)
welcome to Camelia gatherings

Came 390
7 October 2011 (friday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Ampang Park,Jalan Ampang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 391
7 October 2011 (friday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Island Cafe, Jalan SS2/61,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 392
8 October 2011 (saturday)
Time: 10am to 12pm
Venue: Sri Melaka, Amcorp Mall,Jalan Timur,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.
Came 393
9 October 2011 (sunday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Berjaya Times Square (3rd floor),Jalan Imbi,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 394
12 October 2011 (wednesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Teh Chawan,Jalan Telawi,Bangsar,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 395
13 October 2011 (thursday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Jalan Raja Laut,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia. (opposite SOGO mall)

Came 396
17 October 2011 (monday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Pappa Rich,Sunway Pyramid Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 397
17 October 2011 (monday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Teh Tarik Place, The Curve Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 398
18 October 2011 (tuesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: KFC, Ampang Park Mall, Jalan Ampang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 399
21 October 2011 (friday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Opposite Taman Midah,Cheras,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 400
21 October 2011 (friday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Mc Donalds,Masjid Jamek,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.(PUTRA and STAR line stations)

Came 401
25 October 2011 (tuesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Kelana Street mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.(LDP Kelana Jaya Giant)

Came 402
27 October 2011 (thursday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Pavillion Mall,Jalan Bukit Bintang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 403
27 October 2011 (thursday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Starbuck,KL SENTRAL station,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Pls Call /SMS to confirm the date/place/time.
Please give me time to reserve a seat for you.
Do not be LAST MINUTE.I will not entertain you.
You may bring your friends or bosses or spouse.
PLEASE BE PUNCTUAL, Thank you!!
Mobile : 6-016-9795515
Love Camelia
Malaysian Chinese lady

*Venue and time subject to change
*Please pay your drinks / meals
*No entrance fee and no membership

who invent neck tie?

September 16, 2011

The answer as to who takes credit for inventing the necktie is debatable. It was long thought that Croatians mercenary soldiers fighting a 30 year religious war in Europe in the 17th century were the cause of this fashion accessory for men. However, about 40 years ago archaeologists discovered neckties around the necks of “Terracotta” army of soldiers that were buried with the fist Emperor of China to protect him in the after-life. As well in the beginning of the 2nd century Roman Soldier servants are depicted in painting and other art works wearing ties. Rome had forbid any cloth to be tied around a neck so back then there apparently was an anti necktie movement we are seeing today.

April 2011 Gatherings by Camelia

“Came” means Business Networking (referral business/business gathering)

welcome to Camelia gatherings

Came 339
1 April 2011 (friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: pappa RICH,PJ Newtown, Jalan 8,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia. (near Menara MBPJ)

Came 340
3 April 2011 (sunday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Starbuck,Menara Weld, Jalan Raja Chulan,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 341
3 April 2011 (sunday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Station 1 cafe, Uptown damansara, Damansara Utama, Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 342
8 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Coffee Bean, The Midvalley Mega Mall,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia (near MPH/Secret Recipe)

Came 343
9 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Burger King,Masjid Jamek,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia (near LRT/STAR)

Came 344
9 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Jaya ONE,Jalan University,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia (near MPH/Secret Recipe)

Came 345
18 April 2011 (Monday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue:Old Town White Coffee, Pavilion Mall,Jalan Bukit Bintang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia

Came 346
19 April 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 2pm to 4pm
Venue: Nyonya Colors,The Midvalley Mega Mall,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia

Came 347
19 April 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Mc Donald,One Utama Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia

Came 348
19 April 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Mc Donald,One Utama Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia

Came 349
20 April 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Teh Tarik Place, Empire Gallery Mall,SS16,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 350
20 April 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Uncle lim, Subang Parade Shopping Mall,SS16,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia. (next to CarreFour Subang)

Came 351
20 April 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Uncle lim, Subang Parade Shopping Mall,SS16,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia. (next to CarreFour Subang)

Came 352
23 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee, Tmn Midah,Cheras,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia (opposite Taman Midah)

Came 353
24 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Aseana Kafe & Bar,Suria KLCC Mall,KLCC,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 354
24 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,ssTwo Mall, ss2,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 355
28 April 2011 (Thursday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Pappa Rich,Uptown Damansara,Damansara Utama,Jalan ss21,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 355
28 April 2011 (Thursday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Pappa Rich,Uptown Damansara,Damansara Utama,Jalan ss21,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 356
29 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Station 1 cafe, Sunway Metro, PJS,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.(near Sunway Pryramid Mall/KFC outlet)

Came 356
29 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Station 1 cafe, Sunway Metro, PJS,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.(near Sunway Pryramid Mall/KFC outlet)

Pls Call /SMS to confirm the date/place/time.

Please give me time to reserve a seat for you.

Do not be LAST MINUTE.I will not entertain you.

You may bring your friends or bosses or spouse.

PLEASE BE PUNCTUAL, Thank you!!

Mobile : 6-016-9795515
Love Camelia
Malaysian Chinese lady

*Venue and time subject to change
*Please pay your drinks / meals
*No entrance fee and no membership

Social Networking: Fighting to Remain Anonymous
Updated:2011/3/18
In 2008, then-23-year-old Mark Zuckerberg took the stage at South by Southwest Interactive, the annual Austin (Tex.) festival of geekery. The Facebook founder used his keynote interview to articulate his vision for the transformative power of social networking. By tying online identities to real-life ones, he suggested, Facebook would help create a safer, friendlier Internet.

At this year’s festival, 22-year-old Christopher Poole took the stage as the keynote speaker on Sun., Mar. 13. Poole was there in part to promote his Web startup Canvas. But he’s best known as the creator of the anti-Facebook: the message forum 4chan.org, where almost every user posts under the name “anonymous.” In his address, Poole extolled namelessness. Zuckerberg is “totally wrong” about using real names on the Web, he told the audience: “Anonymity is authenticity.”

Bloggers in the packed auditorium instantly posted his quips online, and the tech hordes debated them while sipping free beers under the Texan sun. Felicia Day, an actress and a keynote speaker at this year’s event, took a break from promoting her latest online TV show to plead for anonymity. Without it, she said, “a lot of us are prevented from doing things because of failure and being shamed.” The argument has ramifications for online businesses, too. Facebook is expected to take in $4 billion in revenue this year, according to research firm eMarketer, and part of its pitch to advertisers is that its pages are a clean, well-lit place where brands are safe from anonymous trolls.

Since the days of dial-ups and AOL (AOL), the Internet has been a place where it’s easy to remain unidentified. Chat rooms, message boards, and registration forms are filled with meaningless monikers like “cool_guy123.” Facebook, with its heft of nearly 600 million users, requires new members to sign up using their real names and has a security team of more than 150 to police its rules. Facebook has taken that mission beyond its own pages via a service for website owners called Facebook Connect. On sites that use Connect, which include the Internet radio station Pandora, the gossip blog Gawker, and 2.5 million others, new users don’t need to create new passwords and login names. Instead, they sign up using their existing Facebook credentials.

Facebook went a step further in March when it started offering a free commenting tool to Web publishers. User comments on blog posts and news articles have always been clogged with inane or malicious remarks. With Facebook’s new system, publishers can link commenters to their social network account and display their profile picture and real name alongside their posts. The aim is to weed out the vitriolic dialogue that anonymity fosters, says Andrew Bosworth, Facebook’s director of engineering. “Your identity brings value to the comments,” he says.

It can also bring value to the bottom line. Some comments include information that may help Facebook better target its ads. Partner sites benefit from more page views: The news site Examiner.com saw its referral traffic from Facebook more than double in the first day after it installed the commenting tool. At Sporting News, the tone of reader comments used to be “embarrassing at best,” says President and Publisher Jeff Price. Since adopting Facebook Comments, quality has improved—and so has the site’s perception among advertisers, says Price. More than 17,000 sites implemented Facebook Comments in the first two weeks of its release.

Poole is the clean-shaven face of the pro-anonymity movement thanks to 4chan, which he started in 2003 at age 15. Its message boards attract 12 million unique visitors per month and are filled with comments and images that range from mundane to provocative to obscene. It’s often referred to as “the id of the Internet,” a place that has given birth to some of the Web’s best-known memes, including Lolcats, the popular series of cats speaking broken English. (To wit: “I Can Has Cheezburger?”) It’s also the wellspring of Anonymous, the hacker group that in December attacked the websites of MasterCard (MA) and other businesses that refused to process payments for WikiLeaks. (Poole says he has no affiliation with Anonymous.)

Anonymity online can spawn frivolities like Lolcats, but it’s also important for dissidents, whistle-blowers, and patients who want to research their illnesses, says Andrew Lewman, executive director of the Tor Project. His group operates a network that helps people surf the Web undetected, and most of its users, he says, are “normal, boring people” who prize their anonymity. Poole says namelessness also frees people to take risks that lead to innovation: It’s the difference between learning to ride a bike alone or in a crowded stadium. “You’re probably more comfortable falling over in an empty parking lot.”

Canvas is Poole’s latest empty parking lot for Internet dwellers, and he’s received $625,000 from venture capitalists including the Silicon Valley firm Andreessen Horowitz to develop the business. It’s a snazzier version of 4chan, a place to “share and play with images,” as its tagline suggests. Users upload pictures, then caption, edit, and share them with tools built into the site. As on 4chan, many users choose to be anonymous. It’s also more of a business than 4chan, and Poole—who has a Facebook profile and says he’s met and likes Mark Zuckerberg—has made some concessions. “We are using [Facebook Connect] to verify that people signing up are real people,” he says. Then he clarifies: “But we are not surfacing your name or your profile information.”

Source:businessweek

My MAC Computer

March 16, 2011

What Not to Do: 7 Ways to Ruin Your Resume
by Hillary Chura
Dec 21, 2009

In the time it takes you to read this paragraph, the average recruiter will have plowed through six resumes. (We know; we timed one.) Want to increase the chances of your resume making it to the next round? Then don’t do any of these seven things, which recruiters say — more than anything — make them want to push the “shred” button.
(For more resume tips, check out our interactive critique of an actual resume.)

1. Apply for a job for which you are not remotely qualified
Many candidates believe the job hunt is a numbers game — drop enough resumes, and you’re bound to land something. But shotguns are for hunting pheasant, not finding jobs. The reality is that recruiters hate wasting time on resumes from unqualified candidates. Morgan Miller, an executive recruiter at StaffMark, recalls the security guard who applied to be a financial risk manager (maybe Lehman should have hired him), while Scott Ragusa at Winter, Wyman talks of the aerial photographer who sought out a position as a tax specialist.

“Sorting through unqualified resumes is frustrating, unproductive and puts an extra burden on staff,” says Katherine Swift, Senior Account Director at KCSA Strategic Communications in Natick, Mass. “It also makes it much more challenging to find the right candidate.” So the next time you’re thinking of blasting out resumes to all 60 of the job listings on Monster.com that have the word “finance” in them , save your time (and that of the recruiters) and only apply for ones for which you’re qualified.

2. Include a lofty mission statement
More than ever, today’s savage job market is about the company, not the candidate. As such, mission or objective statements — particularly ones with an applicant’s hopes, dreams, and health insurance aspirations — will dispatch otherwise fine resumes to the circular file. Employers don’t care about how they can solve your problems — certainly not before they’ve met you and possibly not even after they’ve hired you. Instead, write an “objectives” statement that explains specifically how your skills and experience will help the company you’re applying to, not the other way around. And be very clear about what kind of job you’re seeking.

3. Use one generic resume for every job listing
To stand out amongst the sea of resumes that recruiters receive, yours must speak to each and every specific position, even recycling some of the language from the job description itself. Make it obvious that you will start solving problems even before you’ve recorded your outgoing voicemail message. Your CV or query letter should include a just touch of industry lingo — sufficient to prove you know your stuff but not so much that you sound like a robot. And it should speak to individual company issues and industry challenges, with specifics on how you have personally improved customer loyalty, efficiency, and profitability at past jobs, says workplace and performance consultant Jay Forte. Plus, each morsel should be on point.
“Think hard about how to best leverage each piece of information to your job search advantage,” says Wendy Enelow, a career consultant and trainer in Virginia. “Nothing in your resume should be arbitrary, from what you include in your job descriptions and achievement statements, to whether your education or experience comes first [recent grads may want to put education first] to how you format your contact information.”

4. Make recruiters or hiring managers guess how exactly you can help their client
Sourcing experts want to know — immediately — what someone can offer, and they won’t spend time noodling someone’s credentials. “Animal, vegetable or mineral? Doctor, lawyer or Indian chief?That’s what I’m wondering every time I open a resume. If it takes me more than a split second to figure this out, I feel frustrated,” says Mary O’Gorman, a veteran recruiter based in Brooklyn.

5. Don’t explain how past experience translates to a new position
Though candidates should avoid jobs where they have no experience, they absolutely should pursue new areas and positions if they can position their experience effectively. A high school English teacher applying for new jobs, for example, can cite expertise in human resource management, people skills, record keeping, writing, and training, says Anthony Pensabene, a professional writer who works with executives.
“Titles are just semantics; candidates need to relate their ‘actual’ skills and experiences to the job they’re applying for in their resume,” Pensabene says. An applicant who cannot be bothered to identify the parallels between the two likely won’t be bothered with interviews, either.

6. Don’t include a cover letter with your resume
A cover letter should always accompany a resume — even if it’s going to your best friend. And that doesn’t mean a lazy “I’m _____ and I’m looking for a job in New York; please see my attached resume.” Says Lindsay Olson, a partner at Manhattan’s Paradigm Staffing: “I’d like to know why you are contacting me (a particular position, referral, etc.), a short background about yourself, and a career highlight or two. It’s important to attempt to set yourself apart from the competition.”

7. Be careless with details
Reckless job hunters rarely make for conscientious workers. As such, even promising resumes must abide by age-old dictums: typo-free, proper organization, and no embellishment. Susan Whitcomb, author of Resume Magic: Trade Secrets of a Professional Resume Writer, says that almost 80 percent of HR managers she surveyed said they would dismiss otherwise qualified candidates who break these rules. She tells the story of one would-be employer who, when looking for an assistant, decided not to hire anyone because every resume she received contained typos.

“With a 6-to-1 ratio of jobseekers-to-jobs in the current marketplace, you can’t afford to make mistakes with your resume,” Whitcomb says.


A: APPLE

B: BLUETOOTH


C: CHAT


D: DOWNLOAD

E: E MAIL


F: FACEBOOK


G: GOOGLE


H: HEWLETT PACKARD

I: iPHONE


J: JAVA


K: KINGSTON


L: LAPTOP


M: MESSENGER


N: NERO

O: ORKUT


P: PICASSA


Q: QUICK HEAL


R: RAM


S: SERVER


T: TWITTER


U: USB


V: VISTA


W: WiFi


X: Xp


Y: YOU TUBE

Z: ZORPIA

Thank God …. A is still Apple

Bill Gates High School Speech – 11 Things Kids Will Not Learn in School

According to this email, the enclosed eleven “common sense” rules for life were voiced to high school students during a recent speech by Microsoft’s Bill Gates. Many parents and older people are likely to agree with the ideas expressed in this set of “rules”, dubbed “11 Things Kids Will Not Learn in School”.

However, the rules were neither written nor spoken by Bill Gates, they did not originate as a high school speech, and they are not at all recent. In fact, the current incarnation of these rules is a somewhat abridged version of an original piece that was penned by author Charles J. Sykes. The full version was printed in the San Diego Union Tribune on September 19, 1996 and in a number of other publications since then. Sykes is the author of “Dumbing Down Our Kids”, “50 Rules Kids Won’t Learn in School”, and several other books.

The piece has been falsely attributed to others as well as Bill Gates, including the late science fiction writer, Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.
————————————————————————————————–
From a college graduation speech by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr.

Unfortunately, there are some things that children should be learning in school, but don’t. Not all of them have to do with academics. As a modest back-to-school offering, here are some basic rules that may not have found their way into the standard curriculum.

1. Life is not fair. Get used to it. The average teen-ager uses the phrase, “It’s not fair” 8.6 times a day. You got it from your parents, who said it so often you decided they must be the most idealistic generation ever. When they started hearing it from their own kids.

2. The real world won’t care as much about your self-esteem as much as your school does. It’ll expect you to accomplish something before you feel good about yourself. This may come as a shock. Usually, when inflated self-esteem meets reality, kids complain it’s not fair.

3. Sorry, you won’t make $40,000 a year right out of high school. And you won’t be a vice president or have a car phone either. You may even have to wear a uniform that doesn’t have a Gap label.

4. If you think your teacher is tough, wait ’til you get a boss. He doesn’t have tenure, so he tends to be a bit edgier. When you screw up, he’s not going to ask you how you feel about it.

5. Flipping burgers is not beneath your dignity. Your grandparents had a different word of burger flipping. They called it opportunity. They weren’t embarrassed making minimum wage either. They would have been embarrassed to sit around talking about Kurt Cobain or Britney Speers all weekend.

6. It’s not your parents’ fault. If you screw up, you are responsible. This is the flip side of “It’s my life,” and “You’re not the boss of me,” and other eloquent proclamations of your generation. When you turn 18, it’s on your dime. Don’t whine about it, or you’ll sound like a kid.

7. Before you were born your parents weren’t as boring as they are now. They got that way paying your bills, cleaning up your room and listening to you tell them how idealistic you are. And by the way, before you save the rain forest from the blood-sucking parasites of your parents’ generation, try delousing the closet in your bedroom.

8. Your school may have done away with winners and losers. Life hasn’t. In some schools, they’ll give you as many times as you want to get the right answer. Failing grades have been abolished and class valedictorians scrapped, lest anyone’s feelings be hurt. Effort is as important as results. This, of course, bears not the slightest resemblance to anything in real life.

9. Life is not divided into semesters, and you don’t get summers off. Not even Easter break. They expect you to show up every day. For eight hours. And you don’t get a new life every 10 weeks. It just goes on and on. While we’re at it, very few jobs are interesting in fostering your self-expression or helping you find yourself. Fewer still lead to self-realization.

10. Television is not real life. Your life is not a sitcom. Your problems will not all be solved in 30 minutes, minus time for commercials. In real life, people actually have to leave the coffee shop to go to jobs. Your friends will not be as perky or pliable as Jennifer Aniston.

11. Be nice to nerds. You may end up working for them. We all could.

12. Smoking does not make you look cool. It makes you look moronic. Next time you’re out cruising, watch an 11-year-old with a butt in his mouth. That’s what you look like to anyone over 20. Ditto for “expressing yourself” with purple hair and/or pierced body parts.

13. You are not immortal. If you are under the impression that living fast, dying young and leaving a beautiful corpse is romantic, you obviously haven’t seen one of your peers at room temperature lately.

14. Enjoy this while you can. Sure parents are a pain, school’s a bother, and life is depressing. But someday you’ll realize how wonderful it as to be a kid. Maybe you should start now.

http://www.eioba.com/a/1o4s/some-rules-kids-wont-learn-in-school