Relationship Mistakes

March 1, 2012

No.10 Don’t Expect Her To Change

Don’t expect them to change. People change because they want to, not because you want them to.

 

No.9 Find Someone Who Shares Your Interests

Here’s the straight scoop. There is a woman who will love playing video games with you. There is a woman who loves sports. Hell, there is a woman who loves polka, if that’s what you’re into. Don’t get stuck in the trap of believing “what girls are like” and accepting someone who doesn’t mesh with you based on this foolish common “knowledge.”

If you don’t want to be forced to watch Sex and the City, find a woman who’s not interested in Sex and the City, or one who is but who respects that you aren’t. Don’t want to go shopping? Tell your woman or find one who doesn’t want to drag you along. Many of the problems I hear guys complaining about could be easily fixed by finding someone who actually shares their interests instead of the first hot body that catches their eye, or by putting their foot down at the beginning of the relationship. Don’t pretend you like things you don’t, don’t go out of your way to pretend you’re someone you’re not; just be you and find someone who enjoys what you do.

I think this is the secret to happiness in relationships.

No.8 Don’t Make Assumptions

The biggest relationship mistake I see young men make is thinking that “women are this way” from all the stupid “forever alone,” “Hey, aren’t girls crazy?” and “Hey, listen to this story about my crazy girlfriend” stories that float around.

No.7 Try To See Things From Her Point Of View

I would have to add empathy to that list. Being able to place yourself in your partner’s shoes and see things from their perspective is very important when diffusing fights or disagreements. The challenge is to get your partner to also do this on a regular basis.

No.6 Make Sure You’re On The Same Page

Furthermore, be careful for “feelings inequity” (she likes you more than you like her, or vice versa). Not sure if this is a problem, but most relationships go badly because of this. I’m not sure if there’s even anything you can do about it, just something to watch out for.

No.5 Learn To Compromise

The biggest breakdown in communication is when both parties expect different things. You can’t expect to have the same feelings on every issue, but you should be able to find an equitable meeting place. If one party keeps having to compromise but the other doesn’t, it can get bitter quickly.

No.4 Tell Her How You Feel

Tell her about it. F*ck being clingy. If you feel something, really feel it. Say it. If she doesn’t feel the same way, you’ll lose this one girl, but if she does and you wait too long, you could regret it forever.

No.3 Always Resolve Issues

Always resolve issues; don’t leave things you care about unresolved. If you care about something don’t say “That’s OK” when she gives you a half-assed excuse. If it actually isn’t OK that she still sees her ex every Friday night, tell her. It will eat at you if you don’t.

No.2 Don’t Get Personal

When you argue, don’t get personal. Respect her. Don’t say things that will hurt her feelings and expect she does the same. Your loved ones can cut you the deepest, but they never should.

No.1 Make Sure To Communicate

Lack of communication. Make sure you talk sensibly about the things that bother you and, in turn, when she does the same, don’t make judgments too fast; think about how you respond.
Read more: http://www.askmen.com/top_10/dating/relationship-mistakes_1.html#ixzz1npxYjxmP

 

 

 

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now days that……
majority of the men have started loving their own wives!!!!!!**

What Not to Do: 7 Ways to Ruin Your Resume
by Hillary Chura
Dec 21, 2009

In the time it takes you to read this paragraph, the average recruiter will have plowed through six resumes. (We know; we timed one.) Want to increase the chances of your resume making it to the next round? Then don’t do any of these seven things, which recruiters say — more than anything — make them want to push the “shred” button.
(For more resume tips, check out our interactive critique of an actual resume.)

1. Apply for a job for which you are not remotely qualified
Many candidates believe the job hunt is a numbers game — drop enough resumes, and you’re bound to land something. But shotguns are for hunting pheasant, not finding jobs. The reality is that recruiters hate wasting time on resumes from unqualified candidates. Morgan Miller, an executive recruiter at StaffMark, recalls the security guard who applied to be a financial risk manager (maybe Lehman should have hired him), while Scott Ragusa at Winter, Wyman talks of the aerial photographer who sought out a position as a tax specialist.

“Sorting through unqualified resumes is frustrating, unproductive and puts an extra burden on staff,” says Katherine Swift, Senior Account Director at KCSA Strategic Communications in Natick, Mass. “It also makes it much more challenging to find the right candidate.” So the next time you’re thinking of blasting out resumes to all 60 of the job listings on Monster.com that have the word “finance” in them , save your time (and that of the recruiters) and only apply for ones for which you’re qualified.

2. Include a lofty mission statement
More than ever, today’s savage job market is about the company, not the candidate. As such, mission or objective statements — particularly ones with an applicant’s hopes, dreams, and health insurance aspirations — will dispatch otherwise fine resumes to the circular file. Employers don’t care about how they can solve your problems — certainly not before they’ve met you and possibly not even after they’ve hired you. Instead, write an “objectives” statement that explains specifically how your skills and experience will help the company you’re applying to, not the other way around. And be very clear about what kind of job you’re seeking.

3. Use one generic resume for every job listing
To stand out amongst the sea of resumes that recruiters receive, yours must speak to each and every specific position, even recycling some of the language from the job description itself. Make it obvious that you will start solving problems even before you’ve recorded your outgoing voicemail message. Your CV or query letter should include a just touch of industry lingo — sufficient to prove you know your stuff but not so much that you sound like a robot. And it should speak to individual company issues and industry challenges, with specifics on how you have personally improved customer loyalty, efficiency, and profitability at past jobs, says workplace and performance consultant Jay Forte. Plus, each morsel should be on point.
“Think hard about how to best leverage each piece of information to your job search advantage,” says Wendy Enelow, a career consultant and trainer in Virginia. “Nothing in your resume should be arbitrary, from what you include in your job descriptions and achievement statements, to whether your education or experience comes first [recent grads may want to put education first] to how you format your contact information.”

4. Make recruiters or hiring managers guess how exactly you can help their client
Sourcing experts want to know — immediately — what someone can offer, and they won’t spend time noodling someone’s credentials. “Animal, vegetable or mineral? Doctor, lawyer or Indian chief?That’s what I’m wondering every time I open a resume. If it takes me more than a split second to figure this out, I feel frustrated,” says Mary O’Gorman, a veteran recruiter based in Brooklyn.

5. Don’t explain how past experience translates to a new position
Though candidates should avoid jobs where they have no experience, they absolutely should pursue new areas and positions if they can position their experience effectively. A high school English teacher applying for new jobs, for example, can cite expertise in human resource management, people skills, record keeping, writing, and training, says Anthony Pensabene, a professional writer who works with executives.
“Titles are just semantics; candidates need to relate their ‘actual’ skills and experiences to the job they’re applying for in their resume,” Pensabene says. An applicant who cannot be bothered to identify the parallels between the two likely won’t be bothered with interviews, either.

6. Don’t include a cover letter with your resume
A cover letter should always accompany a resume — even if it’s going to your best friend. And that doesn’t mean a lazy “I’m _____ and I’m looking for a job in New York; please see my attached resume.” Says Lindsay Olson, a partner at Manhattan’s Paradigm Staffing: “I’d like to know why you are contacting me (a particular position, referral, etc.), a short background about yourself, and a career highlight or two. It’s important to attempt to set yourself apart from the competition.”

7. Be careless with details
Reckless job hunters rarely make for conscientious workers. As such, even promising resumes must abide by age-old dictums: typo-free, proper organization, and no embellishment. Susan Whitcomb, author of Resume Magic: Trade Secrets of a Professional Resume Writer, says that almost 80 percent of HR managers she surveyed said they would dismiss otherwise qualified candidates who break these rules. She tells the story of one would-be employer who, when looking for an assistant, decided not to hire anyone because every resume she received contained typos.

“With a 6-to-1 ratio of jobseekers-to-jobs in the current marketplace, you can’t afford to make mistakes with your resume,” Whitcomb says.

Obey

February 17, 2011

Is Pink Necessary?

January 24, 2011


Is Pink Necessary?
By ANNIE MURPHY PAUL
Published: January 21, 2011

The “princess phase.” So inevitable is this period in the maturation of girls today that it should qualify as an official developmental stage, worthy of an entry in Leach or Brazelton: first crawling, then walking, then the urgent desire to wear something pink and spark­ly. Whether we smile indulgently or roll our eyes at the drifts of tulle and chiffon that begin accumulating in our daughters’ rooms around age 4, participation in these royal rituals has come to seem necessary, even natural.
Yet the princess phase, at least in its current hyper-feminine and highly commercial form, is anything but natural, or so Peggy Orenstein argues in “Cinderella Ate My Daughter.” As she tells the story, in 2000 a Disney executive named Andy Mooney went to check out a “Disney on Ice” show and found himself “surrounded by little girls in princess costumes. Princess costumes that were — horrors! — homemade. How had such a massive branding opportunity been overlooked? The very next day he called together his team and they began working on what would become known in-house as ‘Princess.’ ” Mooney’s revelation yielded a bonanza for the company. There are now more than 26,000 Disney Princess items on the market; in 2009, Princess products generated sales of $4 billion.

Disney didn’t have the tiara market to itself for long. Orenstein takes us on a tour of the princess industrial complex, its practices as coolly calculating as its products are soft and fluffy. She describes a toy fair, held at the Javits Center in New York, at which the merchandise for girls seems to come in only one color: pink jewelry boxes, pink vanity mirrors, pink telephones, pink hair dryers, pink fur stoles. “Is all this pink really necessary?” Orenstein finally asks a sales rep.

“Only if you want to make money,” he replies.

The toy fair is one of many field trips undertaken by Orenstein in her effort to stem the frothy pink tide of princess products threatening to engulf her young daughter. The author of “Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self Esteem, and the Confidence Gap,” among other books, Orenstein is flummoxed by the intensity of the marketing blitz aimed at girls barely old enough to read the label on their Bonne Bell Lip Smackers. “I had read stacks of books devoted to girls’ adolescence,” she writes, “but where was I to turn to under­stand the new culture of little girls, from toddler to ‘tween,’ to help decipher the potential impact — if any — of the images and ideas they were absorbing about who they should be, what they should buy, what made them girls?”

She turns, like many a journalist before her, to the child pageant circuit, the world of sequined “cupcake dresses” and custom-made “flippers” (dental prosthetics that disguise a gap-toothed smile) that has proved irresistible to reporters since the killing of the 6-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey in 1996. To her credit, Orenstein recognizes this as well-trodden ground. “It would be easy pickin’s for me to attack parents who tart up their daughters in hopes of winning a few hundred bucks and a gilded plastic trophy; who train them to shake their tail feathers on command, to blow kisses at the judges and coyly twirl their index fingers into their dimpled cheeks,” she writes. “But really, what would be the point? That story has been told, to great success and profit.”

Such meta-observations, which appear throughout the book, are part of Orenstein’s method: she argues with herself, questions her own assumptions, ventures an assertion and then has second thoughts — all in full view of the reader. At times, her assiduously cultivated ambivalence seems to paralyze her; she gets stuck between competing concerns, unable to say anything definitive about what she believes. By and large, however, Orenstein’s reflexive self-interrogation is a good match for her material. It allows her to coax fresh insights from the exhaustively analyzed subject of gender and its discontents.

In the case of child beauty pageants, Orenstein offers a shrewd critique of why media exposés of the phenomenon are so perennially popular. They “give viewers license, under the pretext of disapproval, to be titillated by the spectacle, to indulge in guilty-pleasure voyeurism,” she observes. “They also reassure parents of their own comparative superiority by smugly ignoring the harder questions: even if you agree that pageant moms are over the line in their sexualization of little girls — way over the line — where, exactly, is that line, and who draws it and how?” Orenstein allows us to watch her struggle with these questions, and when she arrives at a few answers, they feel well earned.

Orenstein finds one such enlightening explanation in developmental psychology research showing that until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self-­appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

Orenstein is especially sharp-eyed on the subject of what comes after the princess phase, for in the micro-segmented world of marketing to children, there is of course a whole new array of products aimed at girls who begin to tire of their magic wands. These include lines of dolls with names like Moxie Girlz and Bratz: “With their sultry expressions, thickly shadowed eyes and collagen-puffed moues, Bratz were tailor-made for the girl itching to distance herself from all things rose petal pink, Princess-y, or Barbie-ish,” Orenstein notes. “Their hottie-pink ‘passion for fashion’ conveyed ‘attitude’ and ‘sassiness,’ which, anyone will tell you, is little-girl marketing-speak for ‘sexy.’ ”

As Orenstein forges on, braving Toys “R” Us, the American Girl doll store and a Miley Cyrus concert, the reader may occasionally wonder: Is she reading too much into this? After all, it’s just pretend; it’s just play. “To a point I agree,” Orenstein half-concedes, equivocal as ever. “Just because little girls wear the tulle does not mean they’ve drunk the Kool-Aid. Plenty of them shoot baskets in ball gowns or cast themselves as the powerful evil stepsister bossing around the sniveling Cinderella.” By this point the reader knows what’s coming. “Yet even if girls stray from the prescribed script, doesn’t it exert its influence? Don’t our possessions reflect who we are; shape, even define, our experience?”

The author’s process of restless self-examination continues, all the way to the book’s open-ended conclusion. Orenstein has done parents the great favor of having this important debate with herself on paper and in public; she has fashioned an argument with its seams showing and its pockets turned inside out, and this makes her book far more interesting, and more useful. Because the thing about a phase is: kids grow out of it. (The marketers are counting on that.) But parents’ internal deliberations about what’s best for their children are here to stay.

Annie Murphy Paul is the author of “Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/books/review/Paul-t.html?src=me&ref=general

January 2011 Gatherings by Camelia

“Came” means Business Networking (referral business/business gathering)

welcome to Camelia gatherings

Came 298
2 January 2011 (sunday)
Time: 2pm to 4pm
Venue: Bon Ton cafe,Isetan departmental store, Suria KLCC Mall,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 299
2 January 2011 (sunday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Pappa Rich, PJ State (new town) Jln 8,Petaling Jaya, Selangor,Malaysia.(near Menara MBPJ/dewan civic)

Came 300
7 January 2011 (friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Pavilion Mall,Jalan Bukit Bintang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 301
7 January 2011 (friday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Pavilion Mall,Jalan Bukit Bintang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 302
20 January 2011 (thursday)
Time: 2pm to 4pm
Venue: Star Buck,Menara Weld,Jalan Raja Chulan,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 303
20 January 2011 (thursday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Berjaya Times Square,Jalan Imbi,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 304
21 January 2011 (friday)
Time: 2pm to 4pm
Venue: Nyonya Colours,Midvalley Mega Mall,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 305
21 January 2011 (friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Jaya One,Jalan University / Jalan 17,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 306
21 January 2011 (friday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Jaya One,Jalan University / Jalan 17,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 307
23 January 2011 (sunday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Leisure Mall, Tmn Segar,Cheras,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia

Came 308
26 January 2011 (wednesday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Burger King, Sunway Pyramid Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 309
26 January 2011 (wednesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Burger King, Sunway Pyramid Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 310
27 January 2011 (thursday)
Time: 2pm to 4pm
Venue: Teh Chawan,Jalan Telawi 2,Bangsar,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia

Came 311
30 January 2011 (sunday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Teh Tarik Place,1 Utama Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia

Came 312
31 January 2011 (monday)
Time: 1pm to 3pm
Venue: Seri Melaka Restaurant, Amcorp Mall, PJ State (new town),Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia

Came 313
31 January 2011 (monday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Nyonya Colours,The Curve Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 314
31 January 2011 (monday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Nyonya Colours,The Curve Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Pls Call /SMS to confirm the date/place/time.

Please give me time to reserve a seat for you.

Do not be LAST MINUTE.I will not entertain you.

You may bring your friends or bosses or spouse.

PLEASE BE PUNCTUAL, Thank you!!

Mobile : 6-016-9795515
Love Camelia
Malaysian Chinese lady

*Venue and time subject to change

VERY INTERESTING STUFF

November 11, 2010

In the 1400’s a law was set forth in England that a man was allowed to beat his wife with a stick no thicker than his thumb.
Hence we have ‘the rule of thumb’

————
Many years ago in Scotland , a new game was invented. It was ruled ‘Gentlemen
Only…Ladies Forbidden’.. .and thus, the word GOLF entered into the English language.
————

The first couple to be shown in bed together on prime time TV was Fred and Wilma Flintstone.
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Every day more money is printed for Monopoly than the U.S. Treasury.
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Men can read smaller print than women can; women can hear better.
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Coca-Cola was originally green.
————

It is impossible to lick your elbow.
————
The State with the highest percentage of people who walk to work:
Alaska
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The percentage of Africa that is wilderness: 28% (now get this…)
————
The percentage of
North America that is wilderness: 38%
————
The cost of raising a medium-size dog to the age of eleven:
$ 16,400
————
The average number of people airborne over the U.S. in any given hour:
61,000
————
Intelligent people have more zinc and copper in their hair..
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The first novel ever written on a typewriter,
Tom Sawyer.
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The San Francisco Cable cars are the only mobile National Monuments.
————
Each king in a deck of playing cards represents a great king from history:

Spades – King David
Hearts – Charlemagne
Clubs -Alexander, the Great
Diamonds – Julius Caesar
————
111,111,111 x 111,111,111 =
12,345,678,987, 654,321
————
If a statue in the park of a person on a horse has both front legs in the air, the person died in battle. If the horse has one front leg in the air, the person died because of wounds received in battle.
If the horse has all four legs on the ground, the person died of natural causes
————
Only two people signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, John Hancock
and Charles Thomson. Most of the rest signed on August 2, but the last signature wasn’t added until 5 years later.
————
Q.. Half of all Americans live within 50 miles of what?

A. Their birthplace
———
Q. Most boat owners name their boats. What is the most popular boat name requested?
A. Obsession
————
Q.. If you were to spell out numbers, how far would you have to go until you would find the letter ‘A’?

A. One thousand
————
Q. What do bulletproof vests, fire escapes, windshield wipers and laser printers have in common?
A. All were invented by women.
————
Q. What is the only food that doesn’t spoil?

A. Honey
————
Q. Which day are there more collect calls than any other day of the year?
A. Father’s Day
————
In Shakespeare’s time, mattresses were secured on bed frames by ropes.
When you pulled on the ropes, the mattress tightened, making the bed firmer to sleep on. Hence the phrase…’Goodnight , sleep tight’
————
It was the accepted practice in Babylon 4,000 years ago that for a month after the wedding, the bride’s father would supply his son-in-law with all the mead he could drink. Mead is a honey beer and because
their calendar was lunar based, this period was called the honey month, which we know today as the honeymoon.
————
In English pubs, ale is ordered by pints and quarts… So in old England , when customers got unruly, the bartender would yell at them ‘Mind your pints and quarts, and settle down.’
It’s where we get the phrase ‘mind your P’s and Q’s’
————
Many years ago in England , pub frequenters had a whistle baked into the rim, or handle, of their ceramic cups. When they needed a refill , they used the whistle to get some service. ‘Wet your whistle’ is the phrase inspired by this practice.
————
At least 75% of people who read this will try to lick their elbow!
————
Don’t delete this just because it looks weird. Believe it or not, you can read it.
I cdnuolt blveiee taht I cluod aulaclty uesdnatnrd waht I was rdanieg. The phaonmneal pweor of the hmuan mnid Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn’t mttaer in waht oredr the
ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoatnt tihng is taht the first and last ltteer be in the rghit pclae. The rset can be a taotl mses and you can still raed it wouthit a porbelm. This is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe. Amzanig huh?
————

YOU KNOW YOU ARE LIVING IN 2009 when…
1. You accidentally enter your PIN on the microwave.

2. You haven’t played solitaire with real cards in years.

3. You have a list of 15 phone numbers to reach your family of three.

4. You e-mail the person who works at the desk next to you.

5. Your reason for not staying in touch with friends and family is that they don’t have e-mail addresses.

6. You pull up in your own driveway and use your cell phone to see if anyone is home to help you carry in the groceries.

7. Every commercial on television has a web site at the bottom of the screen

8. Leaving the house without your cell phone, which you didn’t even have the first 20 or 30 (or 60) years of your life, is now a cause for panic and you turn around to go and get it.

10. You get up in the morning and go on line before getting your coffee

11. You start tilting your head sideways to smile. : )

12 You’re reading this and nodding and laughing.

13. Even worse, you know exactly to whom you are going to forward this message.

14. You are too busy to notice there was no #9 on this list.

15. You actually scrolled back up to check that there wasn’t a #9 on this list

Donald Trump – Think Big

October 21, 2010

Donald Trump – Think Big

Your Money: Trump’s Advice

Donald Trump: Thought on Entrepreneurs

What’s an LED TV?

October 8, 2010

What’s an LED TV?
By ERIC A. TAUB
When a product has become commoditized and its price is regularly dropping and its profit margins are getting ever-thinner, how can a company boost its sales and raise its prices?

Samsung 8000 Series LED TVOne way is by changing the product’s name.

That’s what Samsung has done with its new line of LCD TVs using LEDs to illuminate the screen. In its print advertising and on its Web site, Samsung calls the new range simply “LED TVs.”

They are not LED TVs. Calling them such makes as much sense as calling its existing line of LCD televisions Cold Cathode Fluorescent Lamp TVs, or CCFL TVs, after the lighting technology that they use.

Whatever its validity, Samsung’s decision to drop “LCD” was a smart marketing move. After all, “LED” is the acronym du jour, a technology that’s all the rage as a new, perhaps revolutionary lighting source. It’s as emotive a term as “HDTV” and “digital” were in their heydays.

But it’s also confusing consumers. An industry colleague told me that in a recent trip to a big-box retailer, he overheard several friends asking what type of TV they were watching. One said it wasn’t LCD or plasma, it was an LED set.

More accurately, it was an expensive LCD set. LED-backlit LCD TVs can cost as much as twice their standard LCD or plasma counterparts. Is the extra money worth it, even if you can afford it?
Here are the answers to some questions you may have about LCD TVs using LED backlighting.

What’s wrong with existing LCD TVs?
Up until now, LCDs used fluorescent tubes to light the screen. As a result, LCDs have trouble creating deep blacks. That’s because fluorescent tubes are always on, and some light leaks through to the front of the display even when a part of the image is supposed to be black. A lack of deep blacks reduces the perceived sharpness of the set’s image.

Also, fluorescents lack a wide range of colors; hence, color saturation is limited.

What’s an LED TV?
It’s an LCD TV that uses LEDs to illuminate the display. There are two ways to do this: either by placing LEDs across the entire back of the display, or by placing LEDs just around the perimeter, which is called an “edge lit” display. Both techniques use less power than plasma TVs and LCD TVs lit with fluorescent tubes.

Which technique is better?
They both have their pros and cons. LCD TVs using edge-lit LCDs can be ultra-thin, because the LED sources are on the side. Edge-lit LED-lit LCDs are also less expensive than LCD TVs using LED backlit technology.

On the other hand, LCD TVs that use LEDs across the rear of the display can create sharply deeper blacks, through a technique called “local dimming.” When a scene calls for a dark image, the LEDs in that area can be shut off completely, so no light leaks through what should look black.

So if I want an LED-lit LCD, I should buy one using back-lit technology?
It’s not so simple. An LED back-lit TV may contain only about 1,000 LEDs. And those LEDs can only be dimmed in large groups, because it is too expensive to control each LED individually. So when you shut off or dim a group of LEDs you may also be darkening part of an adjoining scene on the TV that really should be bright. If you cut back on the dimming, then the blacks will be less dark than blacks in another part of the image that are not surrounded by lighter images.

Theoretically, you could increase the number of LEDs so that each lit just one pixel on the 2 million pixel LCD screen. But then you could just throw away the LCD screen because you would have actually created an LED television — just like the Walgreens LED sign in Times Square.

O.K., but still, LCD TVs with LEDs have great contrast
Sometimes they do. It depends on what you’re watching. As a Samsung engineer said to me last week, “the most dramatic effect of LED-lit TVs happens when the entire scene goes to black” — not necessarily when you’re watching a scene with a mixture of light and dark images.

Do LED-lit LCD TVs produce better pictures than plasma TVs?
Interestingly, I’ve heard no one in the industry claim that they do. At best, they say that with LED-lit LCD TVs, plasma no longer has an edge when it comes to creating deep blacks and saturated colors. But plasma still has a big edge when it comes to price.

How much more do LED-lit LCD TVs actually cost?
Right now, a lot. But that should change as more companies enter the market. The list price for Samsung’s 46-inch high-end LED-lit LCD TV, model UN46B8000, is $3,200. But its larger 50-inch plasma high-end model, the PN50B860, is $800 cheaper.

Later this year, LG will introduce two new series of LED LCD TVs, in 42-, 47-, and 55-inch screen sizes; all sets will use backlit LED technology. Prices have not been announced.

Not surprisingly, Vizio has just broken the LED price barrier. On Monday, the company announced that beginning this September it would ship the VF551XVT, a 55-inch LCD model using LED backlighting. The price: $2,200, or $1,000 less than Samsung’s smaller 46-inch LED-lit television. It looks like Samsung’s strategy to make its LED-based LCD TVs a premium product may have a short life.
http://gadgetwise.blogs.nytimes.com