April 2011 Gatherings by Camelia

“Came” means Business Networking (referral business/business gathering)

welcome to Camelia gatherings

Came 339
1 April 2011 (friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: pappa RICH,PJ Newtown, Jalan 8,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia. (near Menara MBPJ)

Came 340
3 April 2011 (sunday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Starbuck,Menara Weld, Jalan Raja Chulan,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 341
3 April 2011 (sunday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Station 1 cafe, Uptown damansara, Damansara Utama, Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 342
8 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Coffee Bean, The Midvalley Mega Mall,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia (near MPH/Secret Recipe)

Came 343
9 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Burger King,Masjid Jamek,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia (near LRT/STAR)

Came 344
9 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,Jaya ONE,Jalan University,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia (near MPH/Secret Recipe)

Came 345
18 April 2011 (Monday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue:Old Town White Coffee, Pavilion Mall,Jalan Bukit Bintang,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia

Came 346
19 April 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 2pm to 4pm
Venue: Nyonya Colors,The Midvalley Mega Mall,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia

Came 347
19 April 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Mc Donald,One Utama Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia

Came 348
19 April 2011 (Tuesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Mc Donald,One Utama Shopping Mall,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia

Came 349
20 April 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Teh Tarik Place, Empire Gallery Mall,SS16,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 350
20 April 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Uncle lim, Subang Parade Shopping Mall,SS16,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia. (next to CarreFour Subang)

Came 351
20 April 2011 (Wednesday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Uncle lim, Subang Parade Shopping Mall,SS16,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia. (next to CarreFour Subang)

Came 352
23 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee, Tmn Midah,Cheras,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia (opposite Taman Midah)

Came 353
24 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 3pm to 5pm
Venue: Aseana Kafe & Bar,Suria KLCC Mall,KLCC,Kuala Lumpur,Malaysia.

Came 354
24 April 2011 (Saturday)
Time: 7pm to 9pm
Venue: Old Town White Coffee,ssTwo Mall, ss2,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 355
28 April 2011 (Thursday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Pappa Rich,Uptown Damansara,Damansara Utama,Jalan ss21,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 355
28 April 2011 (Thursday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Pappa Rich,Uptown Damansara,Damansara Utama,Jalan ss21,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.

Came 356
29 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 6pm to 8pm
Venue: Station 1 cafe, Sunway Metro, PJS,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.(near Sunway Pryramid Mall/KFC outlet)

Came 356
29 April 2011 (Friday)
Time: 8pm to 10pm
Venue: Station 1 cafe, Sunway Metro, PJS,Petaling Jaya,Selangor,Malaysia.(near Sunway Pryramid Mall/KFC outlet)

Pls Call /SMS to confirm the date/place/time.

Please give me time to reserve a seat for you.

Do not be LAST MINUTE.I will not entertain you.

You may bring your friends or bosses or spouse.

PLEASE BE PUNCTUAL, Thank you!!

Mobile : 6-016-9795515
Love Camelia
Malaysian Chinese lady

*Venue and time subject to change
*Please pay your drinks / meals
*No entrance fee and no membership

What Not to Do: 7 Ways to Ruin Your Resume
by Hillary Chura
Dec 21, 2009

In the time it takes you to read this paragraph, the average recruiter will have plowed through six resumes. (We know; we timed one.) Want to increase the chances of your resume making it to the next round? Then don’t do any of these seven things, which recruiters say — more than anything — make them want to push the “shred” button.
(For more resume tips, check out our interactive critique of an actual resume.)

1. Apply for a job for which you are not remotely qualified
Many candidates believe the job hunt is a numbers game — drop enough resumes, and you’re bound to land something. But shotguns are for hunting pheasant, not finding jobs. The reality is that recruiters hate wasting time on resumes from unqualified candidates. Morgan Miller, an executive recruiter at StaffMark, recalls the security guard who applied to be a financial risk manager (maybe Lehman should have hired him), while Scott Ragusa at Winter, Wyman talks of the aerial photographer who sought out a position as a tax specialist.

“Sorting through unqualified resumes is frustrating, unproductive and puts an extra burden on staff,” says Katherine Swift, Senior Account Director at KCSA Strategic Communications in Natick, Mass. “It also makes it much more challenging to find the right candidate.” So the next time you’re thinking of blasting out resumes to all 60 of the job listings on Monster.com that have the word “finance” in them , save your time (and that of the recruiters) and only apply for ones for which you’re qualified.

2. Include a lofty mission statement
More than ever, today’s savage job market is about the company, not the candidate. As such, mission or objective statements — particularly ones with an applicant’s hopes, dreams, and health insurance aspirations — will dispatch otherwise fine resumes to the circular file. Employers don’t care about how they can solve your problems — certainly not before they’ve met you and possibly not even after they’ve hired you. Instead, write an “objectives” statement that explains specifically how your skills and experience will help the company you’re applying to, not the other way around. And be very clear about what kind of job you’re seeking.

3. Use one generic resume for every job listing
To stand out amongst the sea of resumes that recruiters receive, yours must speak to each and every specific position, even recycling some of the language from the job description itself. Make it obvious that you will start solving problems even before you’ve recorded your outgoing voicemail message. Your CV or query letter should include a just touch of industry lingo — sufficient to prove you know your stuff but not so much that you sound like a robot. And it should speak to individual company issues and industry challenges, with specifics on how you have personally improved customer loyalty, efficiency, and profitability at past jobs, says workplace and performance consultant Jay Forte. Plus, each morsel should be on point.
“Think hard about how to best leverage each piece of information to your job search advantage,” says Wendy Enelow, a career consultant and trainer in Virginia. “Nothing in your resume should be arbitrary, from what you include in your job descriptions and achievement statements, to whether your education or experience comes first [recent grads may want to put education first] to how you format your contact information.”

4. Make recruiters or hiring managers guess how exactly you can help their client
Sourcing experts want to know — immediately — what someone can offer, and they won’t spend time noodling someone’s credentials. “Animal, vegetable or mineral? Doctor, lawyer or Indian chief?That’s what I’m wondering every time I open a resume. If it takes me more than a split second to figure this out, I feel frustrated,” says Mary O’Gorman, a veteran recruiter based in Brooklyn.

5. Don’t explain how past experience translates to a new position
Though candidates should avoid jobs where they have no experience, they absolutely should pursue new areas and positions if they can position their experience effectively. A high school English teacher applying for new jobs, for example, can cite expertise in human resource management, people skills, record keeping, writing, and training, says Anthony Pensabene, a professional writer who works with executives.
“Titles are just semantics; candidates need to relate their ‘actual’ skills and experiences to the job they’re applying for in their resume,” Pensabene says. An applicant who cannot be bothered to identify the parallels between the two likely won’t be bothered with interviews, either.

6. Don’t include a cover letter with your resume
A cover letter should always accompany a resume — even if it’s going to your best friend. And that doesn’t mean a lazy “I’m _____ and I’m looking for a job in New York; please see my attached resume.” Says Lindsay Olson, a partner at Manhattan’s Paradigm Staffing: “I’d like to know why you are contacting me (a particular position, referral, etc.), a short background about yourself, and a career highlight or two. It’s important to attempt to set yourself apart from the competition.”

7. Be careless with details
Reckless job hunters rarely make for conscientious workers. As such, even promising resumes must abide by age-old dictums: typo-free, proper organization, and no embellishment. Susan Whitcomb, author of Resume Magic: Trade Secrets of a Professional Resume Writer, says that almost 80 percent of HR managers she surveyed said they would dismiss otherwise qualified candidates who break these rules. She tells the story of one would-be employer who, when looking for an assistant, decided not to hire anyone because every resume she received contained typos.

“With a 6-to-1 ratio of jobseekers-to-jobs in the current marketplace, you can’t afford to make mistakes with your resume,” Whitcomb says.


A: APPLE

B: BLUETOOTH


C: CHAT


D: DOWNLOAD

E: E MAIL


F: FACEBOOK


G: GOOGLE


H: HEWLETT PACKARD

I: iPHONE


J: JAVA


K: KINGSTON


L: LAPTOP


M: MESSENGER


N: NERO

O: ORKUT


P: PICASSA


Q: QUICK HEAL


R: RAM


S: SERVER


T: TWITTER


U: USB


V: VISTA


W: WiFi


X: Xp


Y: YOU TUBE

Z: ZORPIA

Thank God …. A is still Apple

Obey

February 17, 2011

Is Pink Necessary?

January 24, 2011


Is Pink Necessary?
By ANNIE MURPHY PAUL
Published: January 21, 2011

The “princess phase.” So inevitable is this period in the maturation of girls today that it should qualify as an official developmental stage, worthy of an entry in Leach or Brazelton: first crawling, then walking, then the urgent desire to wear something pink and spark­ly. Whether we smile indulgently or roll our eyes at the drifts of tulle and chiffon that begin accumulating in our daughters’ rooms around age 4, participation in these royal rituals has come to seem necessary, even natural.
Yet the princess phase, at least in its current hyper-feminine and highly commercial form, is anything but natural, or so Peggy Orenstein argues in “Cinderella Ate My Daughter.” As she tells the story, in 2000 a Disney executive named Andy Mooney went to check out a “Disney on Ice” show and found himself “surrounded by little girls in princess costumes. Princess costumes that were — horrors! — homemade. How had such a massive branding opportunity been overlooked? The very next day he called together his team and they began working on what would become known in-house as ‘Princess.’ ” Mooney’s revelation yielded a bonanza for the company. There are now more than 26,000 Disney Princess items on the market; in 2009, Princess products generated sales of $4 billion.

Disney didn’t have the tiara market to itself for long. Orenstein takes us on a tour of the princess industrial complex, its practices as coolly calculating as its products are soft and fluffy. She describes a toy fair, held at the Javits Center in New York, at which the merchandise for girls seems to come in only one color: pink jewelry boxes, pink vanity mirrors, pink telephones, pink hair dryers, pink fur stoles. “Is all this pink really necessary?” Orenstein finally asks a sales rep.

“Only if you want to make money,” he replies.

The toy fair is one of many field trips undertaken by Orenstein in her effort to stem the frothy pink tide of princess products threatening to engulf her young daughter. The author of “Schoolgirls: Young Women, Self Esteem, and the Confidence Gap,” among other books, Orenstein is flummoxed by the intensity of the marketing blitz aimed at girls barely old enough to read the label on their Bonne Bell Lip Smackers. “I had read stacks of books devoted to girls’ adolescence,” she writes, “but where was I to turn to under­stand the new culture of little girls, from toddler to ‘tween,’ to help decipher the potential impact — if any — of the images and ideas they were absorbing about who they should be, what they should buy, what made them girls?”

She turns, like many a journalist before her, to the child pageant circuit, the world of sequined “cupcake dresses” and custom-made “flippers” (dental prosthetics that disguise a gap-toothed smile) that has proved irresistible to reporters since the killing of the 6-year-old beauty queen JonBenet Ramsey in 1996. To her credit, Orenstein recognizes this as well-trodden ground. “It would be easy pickin’s for me to attack parents who tart up their daughters in hopes of winning a few hundred bucks and a gilded plastic trophy; who train them to shake their tail feathers on command, to blow kisses at the judges and coyly twirl their index fingers into their dimpled cheeks,” she writes. “But really, what would be the point? That story has been told, to great success and profit.”

Such meta-observations, which appear throughout the book, are part of Orenstein’s method: she argues with herself, questions her own assumptions, ventures an assertion and then has second thoughts — all in full view of the reader. At times, her assiduously cultivated ambivalence seems to paralyze her; she gets stuck between competing concerns, unable to say anything definitive about what she believes. By and large, however, Orenstein’s reflexive self-interrogation is a good match for her material. It allows her to coax fresh insights from the exhaustively analyzed subject of gender and its discontents.

In the case of child beauty pageants, Orenstein offers a shrewd critique of why media exposés of the phenomenon are so perennially popular. They “give viewers license, under the pretext of disapproval, to be titillated by the spectacle, to indulge in guilty-pleasure voyeurism,” she observes. “They also reassure parents of their own comparative superiority by smugly ignoring the harder questions: even if you agree that pageant moms are over the line in their sexualization of little girls — way over the line — where, exactly, is that line, and who draws it and how?” Orenstein allows us to watch her struggle with these questions, and when she arrives at a few answers, they feel well earned.

Orenstein finds one such enlightening explanation in developmental psychology research showing that until as late as age 7, children are convinced that external signs — clothing, hairstyle, favorite color, choice of toys — determine one’s sex. “It makes sense, then, that to ensure you will stay the sex you were born you’d adhere rigidly to the rules as you see them and hope for the best,” she writes. “That’s why 4-year-olds, who are in what is called ‘the inflexible stage,’ become the self-­appointed chiefs of the gender police. Suddenly the magnetic lure of the Disney Princesses became more clear to me: developmentally speaking, they were genius, dovetailing with the precise moment that girls need to prove they are girls, when they will latch on to the most exaggerated images their culture offers in order to stridently shore up their femininity.” For a preschool girl, a Cinderella dress is nothing less than an existential insurance policy, a crinolined bulwark to fortify a still-shaky sense of identity.

Orenstein is especially sharp-eyed on the subject of what comes after the princess phase, for in the micro-segmented world of marketing to children, there is of course a whole new array of products aimed at girls who begin to tire of their magic wands. These include lines of dolls with names like Moxie Girlz and Bratz: “With their sultry expressions, thickly shadowed eyes and collagen-puffed moues, Bratz were tailor-made for the girl itching to distance herself from all things rose petal pink, Princess-y, or Barbie-ish,” Orenstein notes. “Their hottie-pink ‘passion for fashion’ conveyed ‘attitude’ and ‘sassiness,’ which, anyone will tell you, is little-girl marketing-speak for ‘sexy.’ ”

As Orenstein forges on, braving Toys “R” Us, the American Girl doll store and a Miley Cyrus concert, the reader may occasionally wonder: Is she reading too much into this? After all, it’s just pretend; it’s just play. “To a point I agree,” Orenstein half-concedes, equivocal as ever. “Just because little girls wear the tulle does not mean they’ve drunk the Kool-Aid. Plenty of them shoot baskets in ball gowns or cast themselves as the powerful evil stepsister bossing around the sniveling Cinderella.” By this point the reader knows what’s coming. “Yet even if girls stray from the prescribed script, doesn’t it exert its influence? Don’t our possessions reflect who we are; shape, even define, our experience?”

The author’s process of restless self-examination continues, all the way to the book’s open-ended conclusion. Orenstein has done parents the great favor of having this important debate with herself on paper and in public; she has fashioned an argument with its seams showing and its pockets turned inside out, and this makes her book far more interesting, and more useful. Because the thing about a phase is: kids grow out of it. (The marketers are counting on that.) But parents’ internal deliberations about what’s best for their children are here to stay.

Annie Murphy Paul is the author of “Origins: How the Nine Months Before Birth Shape the Rest of Our Lives.”

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/01/23/books/review/Paul-t.html?src=me&ref=general